Endurance Running Recovery – Part 2

Richard Pine is a NASM Certified Personal Trainer, has been with Metro Run and Walk since 2004, and currently coaches the MRW Training Programs.

Richard Pine is a NASM Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) and Corrective Exercise Specialist (CES), has been with Metro Run and Walk since 2004, and currently coaches the MRW Training Programs.

With the Fall being marathon season for many runners, it is important to recover smartly in order to come back stronger after your event.  Every weekend throughout the Summer has been dedicated to miles and miles of running, the big day has come and gone, you have your medal to show for it, and you may have a few other battle wounds to take home as well.

Last month discussed several tips to recovery directly following the event.

1.            R.I.C.E. – Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation.

2.            Run Light – Reduce your running mileage and opt for a variety of other activities.

3.            Stay Healthy – Immunity is reduced, so take care of yourself.

4.            Think Positive – Beat post-race blues by going for a massage, hanging out with friends and family, participating in a holiday fun run, or planning your next race!

5.            Rehab Intelligently – Seek medical help if necessary and purposefully target strengthening muscles neglected during marathon training

This month will discuss several tips towards actively recovering, developing a more balanced strength and fitness level, and hitting your next training session stronger and injury free.  Since running and walking is a repetitive impact activity, the feet, knees, and lumbo-pelvic-hip structures take the majority of the stress.  As a result, several injuries at the top of the list common to many runners and walkers include:

Runner’s Knee (Illiotibial Band Syndrome)

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Patellar Tendinopathy

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tears

Shin Splints (Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome)

Achilles Tendinopathy

Ankle Sprains

Plantar Fasciitis

After assessing the damage, are rested up, and have the green light to keep going, here are several steps you can take towards staying injury free.  Since the foot, knee, and lumbo-pelvic-hip regions are all interconnected, addressing those structures as well as the surrounding muscles to build more balanced strength and alignment will help you hit the road stronger and in better condition for next season.

1.            Foam Rolling

Key Muscles:

Piriformis (deep buttock muscles), Hip abductor muscles (tensor fasciae latae), IT Band, Inner thighs, Hamstrings, Calves, Outer shin muscles (peroneus longus)

How To:

Using 6-in diameter foam roller, slowly roll each area about 10 times.  At points of maximal pain tolerance, hold for about 30sec.  At points of minimal pain tolerance, hold for about 90sec.

2.            Stretching

Key Muscles:

Piriformis (deep buttock muscles), Hip abductor muscles (tensor fasciae latae), IT Band, Inner thighs, Hamstrings, Calves, Outer shin muscles (peroneus longus)

How To:

Yoga

Work with a personal trainer

Purposefully incorporate gentle stretching into your workout program

3.            Strengthening

Key Muscles:

Shin muscles (anterior tibialis, posterior tibialis), Buttock muscles (gluteus medius, gluteus maximus), Inner Thighs (adductors), Inner (medial) Hamstrings, Calves (medial gastrocnemius)

How To:

Work with a personal trainer

Pilates, CrossFit, etc.

Look for machines at the gym to target those muscles

Cross train and do a variety of different activities

4.            Sports Products

Running/Walking Shoes –

Take the time and money to go through a gait analysis and shoe fitting process and invest in the right type of shoe for your foot type that will give you the appropriate support and shock absorption for pounding out the asphalt.  Make sure your shoes are current.  The lifetime of a higher mileage shoe is around 300-500 miles, which is about 6-months to a year for most people.

Shoe Inserts

Get advice as to whether you need a supportive insert versus a cushioned insert as they have different functions.  A supportive insert will help to account for any structural imbalances in the foot whereas a cushioned insert simply adds more shock absorption.

Supportive Braces

There are supportive braces for the ankles, feet, and knees and are designed to help support the joint as the surrounding musculature gets strong enough to support the joint and as the injury is healing.

Congrats to all you who have finished!

Here’s to a Strong Recovery and the Close of another Year!

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3 Responses to Endurance Running Recovery – Part 2

  1. Great post, I conceive blog owners should larn a lot from this blog its real user pleasant. So much superb info on here :D.

  2. Really great and informative post! Thanks for sharing.

  3. sweetopiagirl says:

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